Now Hear This


;Happy New Ear' / Still of Lindsay Wagner as Jaime Sommers in 'The Bionic Woman' smiling with her hand up to her right, bionic ear / 'May 2014 find you better, faster, and stronger'
The Bionic Woman photo © 1976 Universal Television. Text © 2013 Brian Saner Lamken.
Click to view, like, and share on Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr!


Some Days You Just Can't
Get Rid of a Photobomb


Burt Ward and Adam West posing as Dick Grayson and Bruce Wayne on their Batpoles in Wayne Manor library secret access to Batcave, in black-and-white photo, with Miley Cyrus from 'Wrecking Ball' video pasted in licking one of the poles below them
Photos and characters are the intellectual property of respective
rights holders. Mashup: Brian Saner Lamken for
Exhibit B.


Kindred Posts: Pyg OutHefti Hefti HeftiMiley at Twerk

They're Magically Suspicious


Loki Charms / Photo of Tom Hiddleston as Loki behind bowl of cereal on mocked-up cover to box of cereal of General Mills' 'Bifrosted Loki Charms': 'Oat cereal plus delicious chunks of the Rainbow Bridge!' 'Marvel Limited Edition' title=

Please share freely on Tumblr, Facebook, and Twitter — as well as all those places I don't go like Pinterest and Flickr and whatever...

Update: Comics-art "variant" covers have been added over at Exhibit B.
Here's a thumbnail sneak peak:

Here Am I Sitting in a Tin Can,
Far Above the World


Gravity was spectacular.

I saw the film two weeks ago, and whenever it's brought to mind by something I'm reading or a conversation I'm having I still feel an echo of the absolute sense of wonder I experienced in the theater.



Gravity, starring Sandra Bullock as a civilian mission specialist sent up to work on the Hubble Space Telescope and George Clooney as the veteran commander of her shuttle, demands to be seen not only on as big a screen as possible but in 3D. If you've heard me talk (or read me write) about 3D, you know that I rarely recommend it.

'Fore and Daft


John Oliver wasn't the only member of Comedy Central's late-night team giving
us process wonks a peek behind the curtain in the past couple of weeks. Stephen Colbert was interviewed by Paul Mercurio, who does warm-up for The Colbert Report, over nearly an hour on a variety of topics — but mostly about the Daft Punk fiasco. You can listen to the podcast free.


Stephen Colbert at the desk
Screencap © 2013 Comedy Partners and Busboy Productions.

Daft Punk was scheduled to be on Colbert's show earlier this month but bowed out,
or was yanked, over misunderstandings and Viacom internal politics due to the mysterious French faux-robots' upcoming special appearance at last weekend's MTV Video Music Awards telecast.

Colbert devoted the episode on which they would have appeared to a slightly
fictional account of what happened along with a truly bizarre all-star video set to Daft Punk's "Get Lucky" (featuring Bryan Cranston, Jeff Bridges, the Rockettes, Stephen's animated alter ego Tek Jansen, Henry f---ing Kissinger...) and a last-minute performance by Robin Thicke doing his song of the summer "Blurred Lines".

Oliver & Company


Jon Stewart will return to The Daily Show next week following a summer sabbatical. He was in the Middle East directing a film called Rosewater. For the eight weeks out of twelve after Stewart's departure that The Daily Show was not on hiatus, writer/performer John Oliver stepped in to host in his stead.

John Oliver at the desk
Screencap © 2013 Comedy Partners and Busboy Productions.

If you don't already know that, you may not be interested in the Hulu video I'm sharing of John Oliver's appearance on Charlie Rose from Monday, Aug. 8th, just as John-with-an-h was starting his final week as Jon-without's substitute.

Nothing Special


If you're disappointed in, or simply growing numb to, this summer's would-be blockbusters — The Lone Ranger, World War Z, Man of Steel, Pacific Rim — I have the solution: Joss Whedon's adaptation of Much Ado about Nothing.

Poster for 2012's 'Much Ado about Nothing'

You may be skeptical of a film that can be promoted as "from the director of The Avengers and based on the play by William Shakespeare" but Whedon's Much Ado is just that. And it's a delight.

The Adventurous Supermemes



Man of Steel photo © 2013 Warner Bros. Entertainment. Superman created by
Jerry Siegel & Joe Shuster and ® DC Comics. Text © 2013 Brian Saner Lamken.


Visit Exhibit B for all five Pictogags in this set!
(Warning: Most are spoilery; some more so than others.)

Warg This Way


Kellogg's Possessin' Bran cereal box / Bran Stark from HBO's 'Game of Thrones' on a mocked-up Raisin Bran box with his eyes white as if using his warg powers of possession
Game of Thrones photo © 2013 Home Box Office.
Bran Stark
TM George R.R. Martin. Kellogg’s logo ® and
Raisin Bran packaging © 2013 The Kellogg Company.
Possessin’ Bran parody © 2013 Brian Saner Lamken.
Click to view, like, and share at
Exhibit B on Tumblr!


El on Earth


How did I like Man of Steel?

The answer is... complicated. I'll be taking part in a roundtable discussion for Forces of Geek this week, helping me further hone my thoughts for a proper review. What follows now is bereft of spoilers.


Superman flying above the Earth's atmosphere against the blackness of space
Image from Man of Steel © 2013 Warner Bros. Entertainment. Superman ® DC Comics.

I went into the 12:01 a.m. screening last Thursday night with hope and very tempered excitement. So many movies are getting made from comics these days that I'm often asked how this or that compares to the source material — and even more often asked plainly if I enjoyed it, with my perspective of having liked and/or simply knowing about the comics implied. The whole nature of adaptations, especially those involving long-running characters that have been mined for film and TV repeatedly, is the subject of another post. But what's particularly relevant here is the fact that my opinions on such adaptations, when conflicted if not outright cranky, often get waved away with dismissals — not at all entirely inappropriate, I freely admit — that, well, this is a movie and, y'know, it's made for everybody rather than just fans with a prior relationship to the material and, look, blockbusters with serious actors aren't comics or cartoons.

Party On, Qarth!



A Song of Ice and Fire elements TM George R.R. Martin. The Rocky Horror Picture Show elements TM and © 1975 Twentieth Century Fox. Parody elements © 2013 Brian Saner Lamken.
Click to view larger on Exhibit B !


Siteseeing: Quick Hits


Here we go with a good old link-blogging post for the first time in too long.

screencap from Audi commercial of Zachary Quinto and Leonard Nimoy [© 2013 Audi of America]

I know it's been making the rounds at, uh, warp speed the past few days, but Zachary Quinto and Leonard Nimoy in Audi's "The Challenge" has at least one moment too priceless not to keep sharing. Note: It is a commercial, so if you have a hard policy against watching such things there's your warning. [2:44; via lots of folks]

The Man in the Iron Mask


I found Iron Man 3 a fine kickoff to what Marvel Studios is calling Phase Two of the Marvel Cinematic Universe — Phase One having culminated in the assemblage of nearly every superhero thus far introduced to the MCU in 2012's The Avengers.

Cracked Iron Man helmet
Photo © 2013 and elements TM Marvel.

Given that it builds on what's come before, in terms of the audience's familiarity with the characters and their milieu, Iron Man 3 isn't the best entry point to the series. If you've seen and enjoyed the previous installments, however, Robert Downey Jr.'s Tony Stark in particular, you'll enjoy this one.

For sure it's better than 2010's Iron Man 2, although I found some of that movie's flaws revisited in fleeting moments; the way in which it gets to jump straight into its world without having to set up an origin story might even make it more fun than 2008's Iron Man 1. In that (and some aspects of the plot as well) it's not unlike a James Bond film, a parallel driven home by the closing title sequence and one made explicit too in interviews with co-writer/director Shane Black.

So there's a quickie assessment. I'll add some spoiler commentary after the next graphic. Join me below if/when you've seen Iron Man 3 or just don't care!

Fett Peeve


I'd hoped to have a different post up here for what has become the annual observance of Star Wars Day — May the 4th (as in, "... be with you"). That ain't happenin', so you get an enhanced repeat instead.

Boba Fett
Boba Fett ® and image © year of creation Lucasfilm Ltd.

My younger friends think Boba Fett's a chump for dying (or not) in the Sarlacc pit. And I get that much of the mystery around Fett was ruined by seeing him as a kid in the prequels; same with Darth Vader, frankly. To my generation, though, the prequels aren't real Star Wars and Return of the Jedi barely counts itself. When all we knew of Boba Fett was what you see in the photo above, faithfully reproduced in a kick-ass 12" Kenner action figure, I promise you: Boba Fett was awesome.

Xaro Xhoan Daxos Is a Jerk!


Kitty Pryde, with Lockheed the Dragon, says, Don't Let the Brown Hair Fool You — Of Course I'm a F---ing Targaryen
Pencils & Inks: Paul Smith. Colors: Christina Strain. Art from 
cover to X-Men: Kitty Pryde — Shadow & Flame #1 © 2005 Marvel 
Characters. Kitty Pryde and Lockheed TM Marvel Characters. 
Targaryens created by and name TM George R.R. Martin. Kitty 
Pryde created by Chris Claremont and John Byrne. Lockheed 
created by Claremont and Smith. Text © 2013 Brian Saner Lamken.
Click to view unbowdlerized on Exhibit B!

Roger Ebert 1942-2013


Roger Ebert in his office (1984)

It seems like just yesterday that I was reading Roger Ebert's "Leave of Presence" post, referencing the discovery of more cancer in his body — this, after he'd endured so much — and his promise to write about what he could, when he could, during treatment.

In fact, as I type these words, it was just yesterday.

Then I headed over to Mark Evanier's blog News from ME. After reading Mark's obit of Archie writer George Gladir, I refreshed the page and discovered his brief note on Ebert's passing. I said, out loud to nobody but myself and the computer screen, "Oh crap." Ebert's open letter, noting the 46th anniversary this week of his employment at The Chicago Sun-Times and looking ahead to an expansion of rogerebert.com and other ventures, hadn't sounded like the words of a man who expected to leave this world days later.

Hefti Hefti Hefti


Nana Nana Nana Nana Batman
Nana from Disney’s Peter Pan © 1953 Disney. 
Batman from Filmation’s The New Adventures of Batman © 1977 DC.
Pictogag created 2013 by Brian Saner Lamken.
Click to view larger on Exhibit B!

Identity Crisis


The Bourne Identity, which introduced Matt Damon as human weapon Jason Bourne in 2002, was very good. Its 2004 sequel, The Bourne Supremacy, was great, as was 2007's The Bourne Ultimatum. Last year's The Bourne Legacy, a spinoff focused on another agent played by Jeremy Renner, was not as good as any of them but had its moments nonetheless. I'll expound a bit, without spoilers, after the graphic.

Jeremy Renner in 'The Bourne Legacy' poster / 'There was never just one'
Poster © 2012 Universal Studios.

Unleavened Levity


Fake book cover for 'Pesadick Tracy and the Case of the Missing Manischewitz — by Chester Gould - A Kosher-for-Passover Caper' with signature profile of Dick Tracy in yellow trenchcoat and yarmulke
Dick Tracy created by Chester Gould and ® The Tribune Company.
Text/Design: Brian Saner Lamken © 2013. Click to view larger at Exhibit B!


More years ago than feels possible I drew up a cartoon like this for a Hillel seder at Oberlin. I've yet to come across it in my files but with today's technology I was able to rebuild the thing better, faster, and stronger.

Not that I'm about to draw a whole strip, but I kind-of want to read this.


Kindred Posts: ¿Quién Es Más Matzah?Nice Day for a Sprite WeddingEarth's Mightiest Hushpuppy

NCC-1701-FYI


Star Trek on Hulu

Hulu began streaming every season of all five live-action incarnations of Star Trek on demand today. The Original Series, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager, and Enterprise are available to view free via those links through March 31st.

Also today on its Tumblr blog Hulu launched a bracketed March Madness showdown to determine "the greatest Star Trek character of all time". That's not so much a direct quote as it is a derogatory air-style quote, because while I appreciate that Hulu is just having some fun it's put up an awfully shallow field. Never mind that Q is the only adversary included — there are absences from the core cast of every series, including (or not) Uhura, Sulu, Chekhov, and McCoy, for crying out loud; I suspect that somebody somewhere is even upset that no-one from Enterprise appears. While I realize that to add more characters the number of extant brackets would have to double for it to all work, I can easily come up with another sixteen characters and I consider myself more of a Trekkie than a die-hard Trekker (which makes the Hulu brain trust that came up with this scheme a bunch of Treklodytes). More characters almost certainly wouldn't change the final rounds, especially if the presumptive favorites were seeded properly, but even casual fans are going to ask where Bones is.

You can check out Hulu's preface, bracket overview, and the categories open for voting so far to decide for yourself whether participation strikes you as fun or legitimizing a hopelessly flawed tournament. My knock on Star Trek Madness aside, Hulu is a great way to catch up on current and classic television.


Star Trek logo, photos, and other elements of the above image are the intellectual property of The CBS Corporation.

There Are No Small Partings


I'm not sure what I can say about Celeste and Jesse Forever without giving too much away.

Celeste and Jesse, played by Rashida Jones and Andy Samberg, are best friends since college who married and then amicably separated while remaining buds. The entire plot revolves around whether they reunite and/or how they cope with drifting apart.

If I tell you Forever is a comfort film — not that I'm doing so — you'd probably guess that there's a happy ending. If I tell you that Forever should only be viewed if you can handle relationships going south — not that I'm doing so — you'd probably guess that there isn't. If I tell you that Forever is good enough to withstand either the cliché of the happy ending or the bummer of the alternative, well, I'd be speaking untruth, albeit not of great magnitude; Celeste and Jesse Forever is good, just not quite good enough for me to honestly say I enjoyed [whatever happened].

Spoilers after the poster, then!


Celeste and Jesse Forever poster
Poster © 2012 Sony Pictures Classics.

Okay? You saw it or just don't care?

Flow Rider


Beasts of the Southern Wild
Promo art © 2012 Fox Searchlight Pictures.

Beasts of the Southern Wild is by turns life-affirming, death-defying, and mystifying. It was one of my favorite movies of last year.

Mind the Bollocks


As great as the political satire on The Daily Show and The Colbert Report is, sometimes the shows' finest comedy is wrung out of human-interest stories on the smallest scale.

large white bucket marked 'formaldehyde' with skull and crossbones' / A mystery treat inside specially marked containers!
Screencap © 2013 Comedy Partners.

On Monday Colbert led off with an installment of its occasional series The Enemy Within about some misplaced scallop gonads in Maine. It's a great mix of, on the one hand, making fun of these kinds of field pieces and, on the other, just letting the ridiculous nature of the incident speak for itself. You're guaranteed to laugh or the next post on this blog is free. [Warning: Scallop gonads, in case you missed that, but they're really just the macguffin.]

Earth's Mightiest Hushpuppy


mocked-up poster for 'The Quvenzhers' with Quvenzhané Wallis of 'Beasts of the Southern Wild' in the roles of Hulk, Thor, Iron Man, and Captain America, also with fake blurbs and credits
Photographs, trademarks, and other intellectual property are used
for the purposes of parody only. No infringement is intended or implied.
Text & Digital Manipulation: Brian Saner Lamken © 2013.
Click to view larger at
Exhibit B!


Hide and Sneak


Is Argo worth a watch? No doubt.

Was it worth an Oscar? Not given its competition, as far as I'm concerned, as I wrote at the end of my post-Oscars post last week. But the fact that Argo is merely one of my top five or so movies of 2012 rather than the number-one pick ain't bad. Some thoughts on it that include mild plot spoilers follow the graphic.


Argo DVD
Argo DVD package art © 2013 Warner Home Video.

7 for 007


Maybe there was faint hope of uniting all six men who played James Bond in the cinematic Eon canon on stage last Sunday at the Oscars in honor of 007's half-century in film. All we got was a decent but not exceptional montage and Shirley Bassey singing the theme from Goldfinger, which for the first minute or so I remained unconvinced was not Maya Rudolph doing Shirley Bassey singing the theme from Goldfinger. The Internet, luckily, is here to soften the blow with heaps upon heaps of bloomin' Bondage.

Dr. No UK movie poster

The Bond movies' 50th anniversary actually fell last year — October 5th, to be precise, on the date that Sean Connery's debut as Bond in Eon Productions' adaptation of Ian Fleming's Dr. No hit screens five decades before. Here are seven links — not counting the self-serving ones — that (mostly) honor the Bond legacy, particularly in film.

Exit from Eden


What follows are some thoughts on nostalgia and how it blurs critical assessment — prompted by, of all things, yesterday's post on this year's Oscars show.

I'd like to preface them with a line from one of my favorite interviews — which just so happens to be one that my pal Stefan Blitz (now founder/editor-in-chief of Forces of Geek) and I conducted with comics writer Brian Michael Bendis back in 2001 for my magazine Comicology.

After stopping myself literally in the middle of referring to Stefan as a DVD "connoisseur" Stefan made my point for me by admitting that he owned the 1983 movie Krull.

Cue Bendis:

"You know what's funny about that movie? I remember seeing that movie [at 15] with my mom and my brother, and sitting in the movie theater having my first realization that movies could suck."

The Bloom Is Off the Gilded Lily


I wasn't going to write about The 85th Annual Academy Awards.

Oscars graphic
Image ® & © 2013 AMPAS.

Really. Not outside of some comments on other blogs, anyway. And not because the producers tossed out the formal nomenclature and rebranded this year's show purely as "the Oscars". I'm not above a linguistic gotcha; this is simply not such a gotcha. I honestly expected to be too fatigued and just plain iffy about the telecast that I was happy thinking about not writing about it.

But last night's Oscars telecast, hosted by Seth MacFarlane, was so disappointing that I kind-of can't help myself.

I don't have much to say about the content of the show, which of course won't stop me from saying something as long as I'm here. My anticipated mixture of indifference and irritation was pretty much spot-on. It's that during the telecast I finally came to — hmm... not a realization or epiphany, exactly, more of a rubicon I suppose — a rubicon in terms of my relationship with the annual event. I found myself curiously indifferent about my irritation.

Pre-Oscars Post


As you might've heard, the Oscars are tonight.



The big show starts at 8:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. PT on ABC — whose Go site has a complete list of nominees. If you're into seeing Oscar hopefuls, presenters, and other celebrities on the red carpet, you'll want to check those good ol' local listings.

I'll probably pass on a review of the show. Then again, I've thought that before, and yet — after a bout of Oscars poetry in 2009, when the blog was all of a few days old — I ended up doing post-Oscars posts in 2010, 2011, and 2012. I've enjoyed experiencing other events through the prism of Twitter since joining its ranks last summer, so I just might end up throwing out some instant commentary of my own there as concentration (and WiFi) allows. You can follow me via @BrianLamken, keep an eye on the #Oscars hashtag during the proceedings, or check my page of collected Twitticisms later on.

What Lies Beneath


Skyfall movie poster

James Bond celebrated his 50th anniversary on the silver screen last year. Dr. No hit theaters in 1962, based on the 1958 Ian Fleming novel of the same name (sixth in the Bond series). It made Sean Connery a star, launched a slate of films that would cement Bond as a global icon for generations to come, and kicked off a spate of imitators capitalizing on the spy craze — some of which, like Get Smart and Mission: Impossible, became icons of a certain size in their own right.

Was Skyfall, now out on home video, a worthy way to commemorate Bond's golden jubilee?

Hawk Boy


Bully, a little stuffed bull who is (as Top Shelf's Chris Staros would say) my "friend thru comics," ran a DC subscription ad from 1972 the other day on his blog Comics Oughta Be Fun!.

'Sorry -- I Have No More DC Comics!' / Kids discuss subscribing after newsagent tells them he's out of DC
Subscription ad from Batman #239 © 1972 DC Comics. Pencils: Carmine Infantino.
Inks: Dick Giordano [see below]. Letters: Gaspar Saladino. Script, Colors: Unknown.


It's part of the 365 Days of DC House Ads feature. Every year, Bully gifts readers with at least one nifty daily feature in addition to all the other great stuff he shares, and this latest is right in my nostalgia zone.

Stan Musial 1920-2013



photo of Stan Musial from 1953 Bowman
trading card via Wikimedia Commons


Bob Costas was on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Monday night. In one of the unaired, Web-only clips from their extended interview, Costas shared a nice anecdote about baseball great Stan Musial, who passed away on Jan. 19th at the age of 92. I find the story particularly appropriate to share on Jackie Robinson's birthday, as we celebrate not just No. 42 but those who accepted him.

Musial was a dream come true for both those who love seeing poetry in their statistics and those who love seeing the game played the right way.

Fringe Thinking: Ticket to Ride


With its final episode, Fringe took us back to the first episode of its last and (to me) least season. Much of the capper referenced past moments in the show's run, as Season Five has done to varying degrees throughout. Yet despite the fact that the answer to avoiding its despotic, dystopic future would seem to suggest another rewriting of Fringe history, the events it changed appear to be limited to those that — save for a brief flashforward late in Season Four from which the eventual Season Five sprang — followed the Season Four finale and indeed are, so far, still in our future (or would be if we were living in Fringe's world). Although Season Five has echoed and even recontextualized pivotal elements of previous episodes, it's entirely possible to view the series' bonus stretch as a thing apart, from beginning to the double-shot ending one week ago in...



I'm not sure how much there is to say about the episodes that I haven't said already in this batch of "Fringe Thinking".

Wise to the Wordle


For some time now I've been planning to add a Wordle graphic to the blog. The one below, set in a font called Tank Lite, has at this writing just been slipped into the sidebar between my general and exhaustive lists of post labels. It's followed by four more further down, using four other fonts: Kenyan Coffee, Grilled Cheese BTN, Enamel Brush, and Chunk Five.



Wordle is an online application created by Jonathan Feinberg. You enter a bunch of text into its box and it produces a nifty "word cloud" out of that, customizable in typeface, color, and (to an extent) layout, with the size of each word or phrase based on the frequency with which it appears in the source text.

Mean and Done


If you've ever left a comment on a blog, you may very well have come across word verification.

On blogs hosted by Blogger/Blogspot, as elsewhere, the proprietor can select an option asking commenters to type in some randomly displayed text to prove that they're actual people rather than some kind of automated malevolence. This used to take the form of a single nonsense word that almost always could be a real word, but wasn't; then, last year, the esteemed hosting service joined the ranks of websites using heinously jumbled-up, visually skewed letters and/or letter-&-number combos. Previously the nonsense words tended to have vowels and consonants placed in such an order that they were pronounceable, leading me to devise definitions for (or other reactions to) them based on actual words, morphemes, and phrases they suggested.

I took to sharing those definitions in comments, when they came readily to mind, then filing them away and periodically presenting batches of them here on my own blog. It was an endeavor not unlike Sniglets, which Rich Hall popularized on HBO's Not Necessarily the News and in a series of books back in the '80s, except in reverse. I've laid absolutely no claim to being either the first or the best at this, but I've been told I'm not bad at it either, and I'm genuinely sorry that the absence of that older format of word verification has led to a near-total shutdown in new definitions.

In my previous installment I wrote that the next one would probably be the final one for the foreseeable future. Here we are and so it will.

The following will be added to a dedicated page on the blog collecting over 400 of the definitions, "Meaning Full".

cztory — [ztoh ree] n. A Slavic tale.

ermend — [uhr mend; ee ahr mend] v. Fix someone up in the trauma center.

archMC — [artch em see] n. Preeminent (or sly) rapper.

Pyg Out



Pygmalion and Galatea: Jean-Léon Gérôme c. 1890. Photo: Unknown.
Font: Papyrus. Text & Digital Manipulation: Brian Saner Lamken © 2012.

Fringe Thinking:
You've Got to Hide Your Love Away


Last Friday's penultimate episode of this fifth and final season of Fringe on Fox spotlighted crucial moments in time.

We visited the Invaders' future headquarters in 2609 with Windmark. We learned of the discovery in 2167 that sent humanity down the path of suppressing emotion in favor of clinical analysis, ultimately leading to the Invaders' subjugation of their ancestors in 2015. And we revisited, from the perspective of 2036 and Season Five, the fateful moment in 1985 on Reiden Lake back when the Invaders were merely Observers, the plural was a singular, and the Observer who would come to be known as September rescued Walter and his son from another universe, through the title of the episode...



We also metaphorically revisited Olivia & Peter's day in the park with Etta in 2015, a memory that's virtually been a recurring cast member this season.

It's Gettin' Hoth in Here



Photo: Melissa Billings © 2013 (of a project assembled by the Billings/Soedler family), used with permission. Font: PortagoITC TT (applied by Brian Saner Lamken). Boba Fett ® Lucasfilm Ltd.

Greedo, Buzz Lightyear, and
Spider-Man Walk into the Batcave...


I'm not setting up a joke there. It's just what happens when toy lines collide.



During my sister's visit with her kids last summer we decided to drag some of my old stuff out of the basement. I had got my nephew Ishmael (real name classified) a Batman figure 
for his birthday — from the 2008 Dark Knight movie line, I think, but I was happy to find one in the character's traditional gray-&-black motif rather than the all-black seen in the films. He told me that he "really, really wished" for a Batmobile and he thought that we could find one. Aware that I didn't have a Batmobile per se but having already discussed with my sister giving him some of my Kenner Star Wars figures, I decided to quite literally dust off a couple of great Mego items for him, the Batcave playset and what was officially called the Mobile Bat Lab but I liked to call the Batvan.

Unlucky Days


'Welcome to 2013, X-Men... Hope You Survive the Experience!'
Detail of cover to X-Men #141 © 1981 and characters TM/® Marvel Comics.
Pencils: John Byrne. Inks: Terry Austin. Colors: Unknown. New Text:
Brian Saner Lamken, based on the infamous cover copy of
X-Men #139.